RESIDENTIAL TREATMENT CENTER FOR TROUBLED TEENAGE BOYS

Depressed Teenage Boys Are More Likely To Take Risks

Depressed Teenage Boys Are More Likely To Take Risks

In the cultural consciousness, those who are suffering from depression are people who lay around and are sad. However inaccurate that may be, it can be especially incorrect when it comes to troubled and depressed teenage boys.

For teen boys struggling with depression, they are actually more likely to engage in risky behavior that can endanger their lives. Because of the danger facing depressed boys, it is critical that teenage boys receive the help they need.

Research Connecting Teen Boy Depression And Risk-Taking

In a recent study, researchers collected information on almost 400 teenagers diagnosed with depression. With the information they gathered, the researchers found that teenage boys with depression had higher rates of engaging in risky behaviors.

The most terrifying risky behaviors that the study outlined in particular were suicidal thoughts and a high potential for suicide that depressed teenage boys struggled with regularly. Understanding that teen boys with depression are at higher risk of suicide can help parents see the critical nature of addressing those struggles earlier, rather than later.

Unhealthy Ways Depressed Teenage Boys May Act Out

Some of the other ways that your depressed son may act out are also damaging to his mental and physical health. If you see your teen son engaging in any of the below examples, the time to act is now.

  • Substance abuse – Teens suffering from depression will often try to self-medicate with mind-altering substances such as alcohol, marijuana, or other harder illegal substances. According to the study, this risky behavior is far likelier if your teen has friends who engage in abusing substances.
  • Self-harm – Some depressed teen boys turn to self-harm to express their inner pain. While this can mean more obvious behaviors like visible cuts, parents should look out for unexplained injuries, bruises, or other signs that your teen is in physical pain.
  • Risky sexual behavior – Another form of acting out and escapism that teenage boys may engage in is risky sexual behavior. The physical thrill, positive chemical release, and self-esteem boost—even in the short-term—can give depressed teen boys a brief uplift while putting them at risk of STIs or getting someone pregnant.
  • Aggression – Some boys are not taught healthy ways to express their emotions and often turn to act out aggressively when depressed. This tendency may lead your teenage boy to get in fights at school and home as a way to manage depressed feelings.
  • Suicidal ideation/suicide attempt – Severely depressed teen boys may experience repeated suicidal thoughts and attempt to reach out by talking about their suicidal feelings. Also, at this point, the risk of a suicide attempt is high, and parents should be extremely watchful.

If your son is struggling with depression and engaging in one or more of the above behaviors, he may benefit from attending our therapeutic boarding school for teenage boys.

Find Help For Teen Boys With Depression At Sundance

At a therapeutic boarding school like Sundance Canyon Academy, depressed teenage boys can find a place to thrive. Instead of being encouraged to hide their feelings and other maladaptive coping methods, teen boys will work with therapists and other support staff to learn healthy ways to work through their feelings.

Also, along with the therapeutic elements baked into every aspect, the attending teens will not fall behind on school or life skills. Here at Sundance, we provide our students with a nationally accredited educational program, state-licensed teachers, and tutors to help teens get back on track academically. We also emphasize the learning of essential life skills from personal hygiene to leadership skills to help ensure that when our students leave, they are prepared.

If you would like to learn more about Sundance and how we help teenage boys overcome their struggles, feel free to contact us today to speak to a program advisor.

Speak Your Mind